BIOENGINEERING RESEARCH GRANTS

Release Date: October 29, 1998

PA NUMBER:  PAR-99-009

P.T. 

National Cancer Institute
National Center for Research Resources
National Eye Institute
National Human Genome Research Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
National Institute on Aging
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
National Institute of Dental Research
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
National Institute of Mental Health
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institute of Nursing Research
National Library of Medicine

PURPOSE

Participating Institutes and Centers (ICs) of the National Institutes of Health
(NIH) invite applications for Bioengineering Research Grants (BRG) to support
basic bioengineering research whose outcomes are likely to advance health or
health-related research within the mission of the NIH. A BRG application should
propose to apply basic bioengineering design-directed or hypothesis-driven
research to an important medical or biological research area.

In parallel with this program announcement (PA), NIH is issuing a PA for
Bioengineering Research Partnerships (BRP).  BRP applications differ from BRG
applications in that they will be funded as R24 awards that support an
interdisciplinary group of Partners who work together applying an integrative,
multidisciplinary, systems approach to a significant area of basic bioengineering
research.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2000

The Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to achieving the health promotion
and disease prevention objectives of "Healthy People 2000," a PHS-led national
activity for setting priority areas.  This PA, Bioengineering Research Grants
(BRG), is related to all priority areas.  Potential applicants may obtain a copy
of "Healthy People 2000" (Full Report:  Stock No. 017-001-00474-0 or Summary
Report:  Stock No. 017-001- 00473-1) through the Superintendent of Documents,
Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402-9325 (Tel: 202-512-1800).

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Applications may be submitted by domestic and foreign, for-profit and non-profit
organizations, public and private, such as universities, colleges, hospitals,
laboratories, units of State and local governments, and eligible agencies of the
Federal government.  Racial/ethnic minority individuals, women, and persons with
disabilities are encouraged to apply as principal investigators.

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT

The mechanism of support will be the research project grant (R01). Responsibility
for the planning, direction, and execution of the proposed project will be solely
that of the applicant.  The total requested project period may not exceed five
years and applicants should apply for the length of time appropriate for the work
proposed, typically three to five years.

An applicant planning to submit an application requesting $500,000 or more in
direct costs for any year is advised that he or she must contact IC program
staff, listed under INQUIRIES, before submitting the application, i.e., as plans
for the study are being developed.  Furthermore, the applicant must obtain
agreement from IC staff that the IC will accept the application for consideration
for award.  Finally, the applicant must identify, in a cover letter sent with the
application, the staff member and IC who agreed to accept assignment of the
application.  This policy requires an applicant to obtain agreement for
acceptance of both any such application and any subsequent amendment.  Refer to
the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, March 20, 1998
(http://www.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not98-030.html).

RESEARCH OBJECTIVE

Background

Bioengineering brings a perspective that is valuable for many of today's
biological problems.  Bioengineering integrates principles from a diversity of
fields.  The creativity of interdisciplinary teams is resulting in new basic
understanding, novel products and innovative technologies.  Bioengineering also
crosses the boundaries of academia, science, medicine, and industry.

Recognizing the increasing importance of bioengineering in public health, NIH
established the Bioengineering Consortium (BECON) as a central focus for NIH
bioengineering research.  BECON organized a two-day Bioengineering Symposium on
February 27-28, 1998.  A summary of the presentations and the conclusions of the
panels are included in the full report, which is available on the Internet at
http://www.nibib.nih.gov/.  The discussions and recommendations
of symposium participants aided in the formulation of the BRP and BRG PAs.  For
example, both the BRP and BRG PAs recognize that applications for bioengineering
projects are often focused on technology development rather than on proving or
disproving a scientific hypothesis.  Therefore, the NIH review criteria for
bioengineering proposals in response to these PAs have been modified to ensure
that these proposals are evaluated appropriately and fairly.

Objectives and Scope

The objective of this program announcement is to encourage research in basic
bioengineering areas.  Bioengineering is defined as follows:  Bioengineering
integrates physical, chemical, or mathematical sciences and engineering
principles for the study of biology, medicine, behavior, or health.  It advances
fundamental concepts, creates knowledge from the molecular to the organ systems
level, and develops innovative biologics, materials, processes, implants,
devices, and informatics approaches for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment
of disease, for patient rehabilitation, and for improving health.

Areas of Bioengineering Research for a BRG

Applications for BRG awards should focus on an area of bioengineering research
where progress is likely to make a significant contribution to improving human
health.  It is likely that these areas will be of interest to many ICs.  For
example, materials science may be relevant to the ultimate development of
artificial organs and thus a research initiative in materials science would be
of interest to many ICs even though it is not clear at the outset which organ or
which IC will benefit from advances in the field.  Similarly, bioinformatics may
provide analysis and modeling tools for large sets of biological data, facilitate
home-based devices, and create networks to help manage chronic diseases.  Imaging
may be applied to monitoring of cellular processes, elucidation of developmental
processes in the organism, identification and localization of disease, developing
virtual reality training tools, and monitoring therapeutic interventions. Micro-
and nano-fabrication and fluidics may be applied to creating in vivo sensors,
biochemical analysis systems, imaging systems, and surgical devices.

Bioengineering areas of particular relevance to the mission of ICs are identified
below.  This list is not intended to be exclusive.

Bioengineering Research Areas

o  Biomechanics
o  Bioprocessing
o  Bioelectrics, Ion Channels, and Organ Function
o  Clinical Medicine, Therapeutics and Drug Delivery
o  Combinatorial Approaches to Chemistry, Materials, Genes, and Therapeutics
o  Functional Genomics including Microarray Technology, Integrated Systems, and
Analysis Tools
o  Imaging
o  Nanotechnology
o  Informatics and Computational Methods
o  Medical Implants, Biomembranes, Sensors and Devices
o  Complex Biological Systems
o  Organ Culture Systems and Organogenesis
o  Rehabilitation, Prostheses
o  Cell and Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials
o  Tissue Regeneration
o  Integrative Physiology
o  Drug Bioavailability

INCLUSION OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of the NIH that women and members of minority groups and their
sub-populations must be included in all NIH supported medical and behavioral
research projects involving human subjects, unless a clear and compelling
rationale and justification are provided that inclusion is inappropriate with
respect to the health of the subjects of the purpose of the research.  This
policy results from the NIH Revitalization Act of 1993 (Section 492B of Public
Law 103-43).

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the
"NIH Guidelines for Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical
Research", which have been published in the Federal Register of March 28, 1994
(FR 59 14508-14513) and the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, Vol. 23, No. 11,
March 18, 1994
(http://www.nih.gov/grants/guide/1994/94.03.18/notice-nih-guideline008.html).

Investigators may obtain copies from these sources or from the program staff
listed under INQUIRIES.  Program staff may also provide additional relevant
information concerning the policy.

NIH POLICY AND GUIDELINES ON THE INCLUSION OF CHILDREN AS
PARTICIPANTS IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of NIH that children (i.e., individuals under the age of 21)
must be included in all human subjects research, conducted or supported by the
NIH, unless there are scientific and ethical reasons not to include them. This
policy applies to all initial (Type 1) applications submitted for receipt dates
after October 1, 1998.

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the
"NIH Policy and Guidelines on the Inclusion of Children as Participants in
Research Involving Human Subjects" that was published in the NIH Guide for Grants
and Contracts, March 6, 1998, and is available at the following URL address:
http://www.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not98-024.html.

Investigators may obtain copies from these sources or from the program staff
listed under INQUIRIES who may also provide additional relevant information
concerning the policy.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact program staff listed under
INQUIRIES early in application development with any questions regarding the
responsiveness of their proposal to the goals of this PA.  An applicant may
suggest in a cover letter the IC or ICs believed to be most appropriate to
support the proposed research.

Applications are to be submitted on the grant application form PHS 398 (rev.
5/95) and will be accepted on the standard receipt dates indicated in the
application kit.  Application kits are available at most institutional offices
of sponsored research and may be obtained from the Division of Extramural
Outreach and Information Resources, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Rockledge
Drive, MSC 7910, Bethesda, MD 20892-7910, Tel: (301) 435-0714, email:
grantsinfo@nih.gov.  The PHS 398 application kit is also available on the
Internet at http://www.nih.gov/grants/funding/funding.htm.  Follow the PHS 398
instructions for "Preparing Your Application" with modifications and additions
as described in the sections below.

Annual Meeting.

Each year, the NIH will convene a meeting of the PIs of the BRPs and BRGs to
share substantive results, to help the NIH to maintain a view of the advances in
these fields and have an opportunity for collective problem solving.  The cost
for the PI to participate in the annual meeting may be built into the BRG budget.

Research Plan.

A.  Specific Aims.  Describe the specific aims in the selected area of
bioengineering research.  The proposed design principle(s) or hypothesis(-es)
must be clearly defined.  If possible, include the expected applications of the
bioengineering research that will improve human health or health-related
research. One page is recommended.

B.  Background and Significance.  Briefly describe the area of bioengineering
research that is the focus of the BRG.  Critically evaluate existing knowledge
and approaches that have been or are being directed in the area and specifically
describe how the BRG approach will advance the field.  State concisely the
importance and health relevance of the proposed research to the Specific Aims.

C.  Preliminary Studies and Rationale.  Preliminary studies are not required for
BRG applications, but applicants with preliminary results should describe them.
In the absence of preliminary results, applicants should describe the rationale,
scientific and engineering basis for the proposal.

D.  Research Design and Methods.  A BRG should focus on a significant area of
bioengineering research where advances are likely to affect human health or
health-related research.  If the proposed BRG research is closely related to
ongoing research, explain how the research activities of the BRG will complement
but not overlap existing research.  Provide a tentative sequence or timetable for
the project.  Include how the data will be collected, analyzed, and interpreted.

The number and title of this program announcement must be typed in Section 2 on
the face page of the application and the YES box must be checked.

Submit a signed, typewritten original of the application, including the
Checklist, and appendices, and five signed photocopies in one package to:

CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC REVIEW
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
6701 ROCKLEDGE DRIVE, ROOM 1040 - MSC 7710
BETHESDA, MD  20892-7710
BETHESDA, MD  20817 (for express/courier service)

REVIEW CONSIDERATIONS

Upon receipt, applications will be reviewed for completeness by the NIH Center
for Scientific Review (CSR).  Incomplete applications will be returned to the
applicant without further consideration.  Applications that are complete will be
evaluated for scientific and technical merit by Scientific Review Groups (SRGs)
of the CSR.  As part of the initial merit review, all applications may be
subjected to standard NIH streamlined review procedures; nevertheless, each
application will receive a written critique.

Review criteria

The NIH review criteria have been adapted to ensure that a BRG application is
evaluated appropriately.  The score should reflect the overall impact that the
BRG award could have on the selected area of bioengineering research based on
consideration of the five criteria, with the emphasis on each criterion varying
from one application to another, depending on the nature of the application and
its relative strengths.  Note that an application need not be strong in all
categories to be judged likely to have major scientific impact and thus deserve
a high priority score.  For example, an investigator may propose to carry out
important work that by its nature is not innovative but is essential to move a
field forward.  The review criteria are:

(1) Significance.  If the Specific Aims of the BRG are achieved, will they
provide significant advances in the selected area of bioengineering research? Is
the research likely to have a significant impact on other areas of research?

(2) Approach.  Are the BRG approaches and methods adequately developed, well
integrated, and appropriate to the aims of the project? Does the applicant
acknowledge potential problem areas and consider alternative tactics?

(3) Innovation.  Does the BRG propose new approaches or explore new research
paradigms or new concepts that will affect bioengineering, basic or clinical
sciences? Are extant approaches or concepts applied to new scientific problems
in novel ways?

(4) Investigators.  Are the PI and key personnel appropriately trained in their
disciplines and capable of conducting the proposed research?

(5) Environment.  Does the scientific and technological environment in which the
work will be done contribute to the probability of success? Does the proposed
research take advantage of unique features of the scientific environment or
employ useful collaborative arrangements? Is there evidence of other support that
will contribute to the success of the research?

In addition to these five review criteria, applicants must demonstrate adequate
provisions for the protection of human and animal subjects, the safety of the
research environment, and conformance with the "NIH Guidelines for the Inclusion
of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical Research," and "NIH Policy And
Guidelines On The Inclusion Of Children As Participants In Research Involving
Human Subjects."

AWARD CRITERIA

Applications will compete for available funds with all other approved
applications.  The following will be considered in making funding decisions:

o  Quality of the proposed research as determined by peer review
o  Availability of funds
o  Institute's priority for area of proposed research

INQUIRIES

The opportunity to clarify any issues or questions regarding an application is
welcome.  

Questions regarding BRG scientific issues, management issues, or issues on cores
related to participating ICs may be directed to:

NCI
Carol Dahl, Ph.D.
National Cancer Institute
Building 31, Room 11A03, MSC 2590
Bethesda, MD  20892-2590
Telephone:  (301) 496-1550
FAX:  (301) 496-7807
Email:  carol_dahl@nih.gov

NCRR
Richard Dubois, Ph.D.
Biomedical Technology
National Center for Research Resources
6705 Rockledge Drive, Room 61060, MSC 7965
Bethesda, MD  20892-7965
Telephone:  (301) 435-0755
FAX:  (301) 480-3659
Email:  rickard@ncrr.nih.gov

NEI
Lore Anne McNicol, Ph.D.
National Eye Institute
6120 Executive Boulevard, Suite 350, MSC 7164
Bethesda, MD  20892-7164
Telephone:  (301) 496-5301
FAX:  (301) 402-0528
Email:  loreanne.mcnicol@nei.nih.gov

NHGRI
Jeffery A. Schloss, Ph.D.
Division of Extramural Research
National Human Genome Research Institute
Building 38A, Room 614, MSC 7531
Bethesda, MD  20892-6050
Telephone:  (301) 496-7531
FAX:  (301) 480-2770
Email:  jeff_schloss@nih.gov

NHLBI
John T. Watson, Ph.D.
Acting Deputy Director
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
9000 Rockville Pike, Room 5A49
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 496-1078
FAX:  (301) 402-3686
Email:  jw53f@nih.gov

NIA
Evan Hadley, M.D.
Geriatrics
National Institute on Aging
Gateway Building, Suite 3E327, MSC 9205
Bethesda, MD  20892-9205
Telephone:  (301) 435-3044
FAX:  (301) 402-1784
Email:  hadleye@exmur.nia.nih.gov

NIAAA
Jules Selden, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Division of Basic Research
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Suite 402, MSC 7003
Bethesda, MD  20892-7003
Telephone:  (301) 443-2678
FAX:  (301) 594-0673
Email:  js365c@nih.gov

NIAID
Vicki Seyfert, Ph.D.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
6003 Executive Boulevard, Room 4A21
Rockville, MD  20852
Telephone:  (301) 496-7551
FAX:  (301) 402-2571
Email:  vs62y@nih.gov

NIAMS
James S. Panagis, M.D., M.P.H.
Musculoskeletal Diseases Branch
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
6500 Center Drive, Room 5AS-37K
Bethesda, MD 20892-6500
Telephone:  (301) 594-5055
FAX:  (301) 480-4543
Email:  jp149d@nih.gov

NICHD
Louis A. Quatrano, Ph.D.
National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Building 61E, Room 2A03
Bethesda, MD  20892-7510
Telephone:  (301) 402-2242
FAX:  (301) 402-0832
Email:  quatranl@hd01.nichd.nih.gov

NIDA
Thomas G. Aigner, Ph.D.
Division of Basic Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Parklawn Building, Room 10A-19
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-6975
FAX:  (301) 594-6443
Email:  ta17r@nih.gov

NIDCD
Lynn E. Huerta, Ph.D.
Division of Human Communication
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 400-C, MSC 7180
Bethesda, MD 20892-7180
Telephone:  (301) 402-3458
FAX:  (301) 402-6251
Email:  Lynn_Huerta@nih.gov

NIDDK
Joan T. Harmon, Ph.D.
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
45 CENTER DRIVE, Room 5AN-18G MSC 6600
BETHESDA, MD 20892-6600
Telephone:  (301) 594-8808
FAX:  (301) 480-3503
E-mail:  HarmonJ@extra.niddk.nih

NIDR
Eleni Kousvelari
Division of Extramural Research
National Institute of Dental Research
Natcher Building, Room 4AN 18A, MSC 6402
Bethesda, MD 20892-6402
Telephone:  (301) 594-2427
FAX:  (301) 480-8318
Email:  kousvelari@de45.nidr.nih.gov

NIEHS
Jose Velazquez, Ph.D.
Division of Extramural Research Training
National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences
P.O. Box 12233, MSC EC-21
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709
Telephone:  (919) 541-4998
FAX:  (919) 541-2860
Email:  velazqu1@niehs.nih.gov

NIGMS
Warren Jones, Ph.D.
Division of Pharmacology, Physiology and Biological Chemistry
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
45 Center Drive, Room 2AS-43H, MSC 6200
Bethesda, MD  20892-6200
Telephone:  (301) 594-5938
FAX:  (301) 480-2802
Email:  jonesw@nigms.nih.gov

NIMH
Michael F. Huerta, Ph.D.
Division of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience Research
National Institute of Mental Health
Parklawn Building, Room 11-103
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-3563
FAX:  (301) 443-1731
Email:  mhuerta@helix.nih.gov

NINDS
William Heetderks, M.D., Ph.D.
Division of Stroke, Trauma, and Neurodegenerative Disorders
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Federal Building, Room 8A13
Bethesda, MD  20892-9155
Telephone:  (301) 496-9155
FAX:  (301) 402-1501
Email:  Heet@nih.gov

NINR
Hilary D. Sigmon, Ph.D., RN
Division of Extramural Activities
National Institute of Nursing Research
45 Center Drive, Room 3AN12, MSC 6300
Bethesda, MD  20892-6300
Telephone:  (301) 594-5970
FAX:  (301) 480-8260
Email:  hilary_sigmon@nih.gov

NLM
Peter Clepper
Program Officer
National Library of Medicine
6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 301
Bethesda, MD  20871
Telephone:  (301) 594-4882
FAX:  (301) 402-2952
Email:  clepper@nlm.nih.gov

Questions on fiscal issues may be directed to:

NCI
Bill Wells
Grants Administration Branch
National Cancer Institute
6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 243, MSC 7150
Bethesda, MD  20892-7150
Telephone:  (301) 496-7800
FAX:  (301) 496-8601
Email:  wellsw@gab.nci.nih.gov

NCRR
Joellen Harper
Office of Grants Management
National Center for Research Resources
6705 Rockledge Drive, Room 6086, MSC 7965
Bethesda, MD  20892-7965
Telephone:  (301) 435-0836
FAX:  (301) 402-1951
Email:  harperj@ncrr.nih.gov

NEI
Carolyn E. Grimes
Grants Management Officer
National Eye Institute
6120 Executive Boulevard, Suite 350, MSC 7164
Bethesda, MD  20892-7164
Telephone:  (301) 496-5884
FAX:  (301) 402-0528
Email:  cegrimes@nei.nih.gov

NHGRI
Jean Cahill
Grants Management Officer
National Human Genome Research Institute
Building 38A, Room 613, MSC 6050
Bethesda, MD 20892-6050
Telephone:  (301) 402-0733
FAX:  (301) 402-1951
Email:  jean_cahill@nih.gov

NHLBI
William Darby
Grants Management Officer
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
6701 Rockledge Drive, Suite 7128
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 435-0177
FAX:  (301) 480-3310
Email:  wd8u@nih.gov

NIA
Joseph Ellis
Grants and Contracts Management Officer
National Institute on Aging
Gateway Building, Suite 2N212
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 496-1472
FAX:  (301) 402-3672
Email:  ellisj@exmur.nia.nih.gov

NIAAA
Linda Hilley
Grants Management Officer
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Suite 504
Bethesda, MD  20892-7003
Telephone:  (301) 443-4704
FAX:  (301) 443-3891
Email:  lh67b@nih.gov

NIAID
Linda Shaw
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
6003 Executive Boulevard, Room 4B-31
Rockville, MD  20850
Telephone:  (301) 402-6611
FAX:  (301) 480-3780
Email:  ls15k@nih.gov

NIAMS
Irene Grissom
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
6500 Center Drive, Room 5AS-43J
Bethesda, MD  20892-6500
Telephone:  (301) 594-3507
FAX:  (301) 480-5450
Email:  grissomi@mail.nih.gov

NICHD
Mary Ellen Colvin
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Building 61E, Room 8A17
Bethesda, MD  20892-7510
Telephone:  (301) 496-1303
FAX:  (301) 402-0915
Email:  MC113B@nih.gov

NIDA
Gary Fleming, J.D., M.A.
Grants Management Branch
National Institute on Drug Abuse
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-6710
FAX:  (301) 594-6847
Email:  gf6s@nih.gov

NIDCD
Sharon Hunt
Grants Management Branch
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 400-C, MSC 7180
Bethesda, MD  20892-7180
Telephone:  (301) 402-0909
FAX:  (301) 402-1758
Email:  sharon_hunt@nih.gov

NIDDK
Nancy Dixon
Grants Management Officer
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
45 Center Drive, Room 6AS49K, MSC 6600
Bethesda, MD  20892-6600
Telephone:  (301) 594-8854
FAX:  (301) 480-4237
Email:  dixonn@extra.niddk.nih.gov

NIDR
Kevin Crist
Division of Extramural Research
National Institute of Dental Research
Natcher Building, Room 4AS 55
Bethesda, MD  20892-6402
Telephone:  (301) 594-4800
FAX:  (301) 480-8301
Email:  Kevin.Crist@nih.gov

NIEHS
David Mineo
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
P.O. Box 12233, MSC EC-21
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709
Telephone:  (919) 541-1373
FAX:  (919) 541-2860
Email:  dm44x@nih.gov

NIGMS
Antoinette Holland
Grants Management Specialist
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
45 Center Drive, Room 2AN-50B, MSC 6200
Bethesda, MD  20892-6200
Telephone:  (301) 594-5132
FAX:  (301) 480-2554
Email:  hollanda@nigms.nih.gov

NIMH
Diana S. Trunnell
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Mental Health
Parklawn Building, Room 7C-08
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-2805
FAX:  (301) 443-6885
Email:  Diana_Trunnell@nih.gov

NINDS
Brenda Kibler
Grants Management Specialist
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Federal Building, Room 1004
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 496-9231
FAX:  (301) 402-0219
Email:  bk29j@nih.gov

NINR
Jeff Carow
Division of Extramural Activities
National Institute of Nursing Research
45 Center Drive, Room 3AN12, MSC 6300
Bethesda, MD  20892-6300
Telephone:  (301) 594-6869
FAX:  (301) 480-8260
Email:  jeff_carow@nih.gov

NLM
Dwight Mowery
Extramural Programs
National Library of Medicine
6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 301
Bethesda, MD  20871
Telephone:  (301) 496-4221
FAX:  (301) 402-2952
Email:  moweryd@mail.nlm.nih.gov

AUTHORITY AND REGULATIONS

This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Nos.
93.394, 93.395, 93.396, 93.306, 93.867, 93.172, 93.837, 93.838, 93.839, 93.866,
93.273, 93.855, 93.856, 93.846, 93.864, 93.865, 93.929, 93.279, 93.173, 93.121,
93.847, 93.848, 93.849, 93.113, 93.821, 93.859, 93.862, 93.242, 93.853, 93.854,
93.361, and 93.879.  Awards are made under authorization of the Public Health
Service Act, Title IV, Part A (Public Law 78-410, as amended by Public Law
99-158, 42 USC 241 and 285). Awards will be administered under PHS grants
policies and Federal Regulations 42 CFR Part 52 and 45 CFR Part 74 and Part 92. 
This program is not subject to the intergovernmental review requirements of
Executive Order 12372 or Health Systems review.

The PHS strongly encourages all grant and contract recipients to provide a smoke-
free workplace and promote the non-use of all tobacco products.  In addition,
Public Law 103-227, the Pro-Children Act of 1994, prohibits smoking in certain
facilities (or, in some cases, any portion of a facility) in which regular or
routine education, library, day care, health care or early childhood development
services are provided to children.  This is consistent with the PHS mission to
protect and advance the physical and mental health of the American people.


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